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What is the name of the king whose brother has been raised as a girl?

What is the name of the king whose brother has been raised as a girl?



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I remember reading about a prince (probably French) who has been raised as a girl to avoid him fighting against his brother for the throne, a few years ago. To be honest, the story seems intriguing and I'd like to know more about it but I can't bring myself to remember any name.


Are you thinking of Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, brother of Louis XIV?


Wars of the Roses

The Wars of the Roses were a series of bloody civil wars for the throne of England between two competing royal families: the House of York and the House of Lancaster, both members of the age-old royal Plantagenet family. Waged between 1455 and 1485, the Wars of the Roses earned its flowery name because the white rose was the badge of the Yorks, and the red rose was the badge of the Lancastrians. After 30 years of political manipulation, horrific carnage and brief periods of peace, the wars ended and a new royal dynasty emerged.


Jane Seymour

At Queen Anne’s coronation in June 1533, she was nearly six months pregnant, and in September she gave birth to a girl, Elizabeth, rather than the much-longed-for male heir. She later had two stillborn children, and suffered a miscarriage in January 1536 the fetus appeared to be male.

By that time, Anne’s relationship with Henry had soured, and he had his eye on her lady-in-waiting, the demure Jane Seymour.

After Anne’s latest miscarriage, and the death of Catherine that same month, rumors began flying that Henry wanted to get rid of Anne so he could marry Jane. (Had he attempted to annul his second marriage while Catherine was still alive, it would have raised speculation that his first marriage was valid after all.)

Henry had apparently convinced himself that Anne had seduced him by witchcraft, and also told Cromwell (Anne’s former ally, now her rival for power in Henry’s court) that he wanted to take steps towards repairing relations with Emperor Charles.


Pleiades Mythology

Seduced by Poseidon and gave birth to either Hyrieus (the name of Orion's father, but perhaps not the same Hyrieus) or Anthas, founder of Anthæa, Hyperea, and Halicarnassus.

Another Alcyone, daughter of Æolus (guardian of the winds) and Ægiale, married Ceyx of Trachis the two jokingly called each other Hera and Zeus, vexing those gods, who drowned Ceyx in a storm at sea Alcyone threw herself into the sea at the news, and was transformed into a halcyon (kingfisher). Legend has it the halcyon hen buries her dead mate in the winter before laying her eggs in a compact nest and setting it adrift on the sea Æolus forbids the nest to be disturbed, so the water is calm for 14 days centered on the winter solstice, called the Halcyon Days. The actual bird does not build nests however instead the story probably derives from an old pagan observance of the turning season, with the moon-goddess conveying a dead symbolic king of the old year to his resting place. Though this Alcyone and the Pleiad Alcyone appear to be separate individuals, they may be related: in 2000 BC, a vigorous period of ancient astronomy, the Pleiades rose nearly four hours earlier than they do today for the same time of year, and were overhead at nightfall on the winter solstice, when the Halcyon supposedly nested their conjunction with the sun during spring equinoxes at that time may have something to do with the association of the cluster with birds, which are often used as symbols of life and renewal.

In some accounts, ravished by Ares and gave birth to Oenomaus, king of Pisa. In others, Oenomaus was her husband, and they had a beautiful daughter, Hippodaima, and three sons, Leucippus, Hippodamus, and Dysponteus, founder of Dyspontium or, Oenomaus may instead have had these children with Euarete, daughter of Acrisius.

Another Asterope was daughter of the river Cebren.

Still another was daughter of Porthaön, and may have been the mother of the Sirens, who lured sailors to their deaths with their enchanting singing.

A possible alternate name is Asterië (`of the starry sky' or `of the sun'), which may also be a name for the creatrix of the universe, Eurynome, in the Pelasgian myth. Graves mentions her as a Pleiad only in passing, with no other mention in the other references. Perhaps she was at one time a Pleiad when different names were used, or an earlier version of Sterope, whose name is similar or perhaps Graves is incorrect. He also in passing calls the titan or oak-goddess Dione a Pleiad, without explanation or corroboration. Does the term have a broader meaning in some contexts?

Had sons Lycus (``wolf'') and Chimærus (``he-goat'') by Prometheus. No other data.

Wife of Corythus seduced by Zeus and gave birth to Dardanus, founder of Troy, ancestor of Priam and his house. Called Atlantis by Ovid, personifying the family. May also, by Thaumas, be the mother of the Harpies, foul bird-women who lived in a Cretan cave and harried criminals, but this could be a different ocean-nymph of the same name.

Another Electra was a daughter of Oedipus, though this may not be the same Oedipus who killed his father and married his mother. She is said to be mother of Dardanus and Iason.

Yet another Electra was a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytæmnestra, with an alternate name of Laodice, and with brother Orestes and sisters Chrysothemis and Iphigeneia (or Iphianassa), though the latter sister may have been Clytæmnestra's niece, adopted from Theseus and Helen. Agamemnon was king of Mycenæ and led the Greeks against Troy he was murdered at his return by Clytæmnestra and her lover Ægisthus, both of whom Orestes and Electra killed in revenge, whence the psychological term `Electra complex'. This Electra was also wife to the peasant Pylades, and bore him Medon and Strophius the Second.

Eldest and most beautiful of the sisters a mountain nymph in Arcadia. Seduced by Zeus and gave birth to Hermes. Later became foster-mother to Arcas, son of Zeus and Callisto, during the period while Callisto was a bear, and before she and Arcas were placed in the heavens by Zeus (she as Ursa Major, he as either Boötes or Ursa Minor).

Another Maia was the Roman goddess of spring, daughter of Faunus and wife of Vulcan (his Greek counterpart, Hephæstus, married Aphrodite instead). Farmers were cautioned not to sow grain before the time of her setting, or conjunction with the sun. The month of May is named after her, and is coincidentally(?) the month in which the solar conjunction happens. By our modern calendar, the conjunction occurred in April in early Roman times, with the shift since then due to the precession of the Earth's axis but calendars too have changed over time, especially before the time of Julius Caesar, so the month and the cluster's solar conjunction may have lined up then as well.

Married Sisyphus ( se-sophos , `very wise'), son of Æolus, grandson of Deucalion (the Greek Noah), and great-grandson of Prometheus. She bore Sisyphus sons Glaucus, Ornytion, and Sinon she is sometimes also said to be mother of Dædalus, though others in the running are Alcippe and Iphinoë. Sisyphus founded the city of Ephyre (Corinth) and later revealed Zeus's rape of Ægina to her father Asopus (a river), for which Zeus condemned Sisyphus to roll a huge stone up a hill in Hades, only to have it roll back down each time the task was nearly done. Glaucus (or Glaukos) was father of Bellerophon, and in one story was killed by horses maddened by Aphrodite because he would not let them breed. He also led Lycian troops in the Trojan War, and in the Iliad was tricked by the Greek hero Diomedes into exchanging his gold armor for Diomedes' brass, the origin of the term `Diomedian swap'. Another Glaucus was a fisherman of Boeotia who became a sea-god gifted with prophecy and instructed Apollo in soothsaying. Still another Glaucus was a son of Minos who drowned in a vat of honey and was revived by the seer Polyidos, who instructed Glaucus in divination, but, angry at being made a prisoner, caused the boy to forget everything when Polyidos finally left Crete. The word glaukos means gleaming, bluish green or gray, perhaps describing the appearance of a blind eye if glaucoma (cataract) derives from it. Is the name Glaucus a reference to sight, or blindness, physical or otherwise? It is also curious that meropia is a condition of partial blindness.

Another Merope was daughter of Dionysus's son Oenopion, king of Chios Orion fell in love with her, and Oenopion refused to give her up, instead having him blinded. Orion regained his sight and sought vengeance, but was killed by Artemis, or by a scorpion, or by some other means (many versions).

Yet another Merope and her sister Cleothera (with alternate names of Cameiro and Clytië for the two of them) were orphaned daughters of Pandareus.

Still another was mother of Æpytus by Cresphontes, king of Messenia. Her husband was murdered by Polyphontes, who claimed both her and the throne, but was later killed by Æpytus to avenge his father's death.

One last, more often known as Periboea, was wife of Polybus, king of Corinth. The two of them adopted the infant Oedipus after his father Laius left him to die, heeding a prophecy that his son would kill him, which, of course, he eventually did.

Seduced by Zeus and gave birth to Lacedæmon, founder of Sparta, to which she was thus an important goddess. In some versions of the story, she was unwilling to yield to Zeus, and was disguised by Artemis as a hind (female red deer) to elude him but he eventually caught her and begot on her Lacedæmon, whereupon she hanged herself.


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What happened to Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII’s children?

Their union was not to continue happily, if it had ever begun so. Catherine was pregnant at least six times between 1509 and 1518, and while she bore him a daughter, the future Mary I (b1516), their relationship was plagued by multiple miscarriages and stillbirths. Alison Weir writes how these tragedies left Katherine suffering a strong sense of failure because “she had desired to gladden the King and the people with a prince”.

When she gave birth to a boy, christened Henry, on New Year’s Day 1511, bonfires were lit in London and the news was met with “very great pomp and rejoicing”. Yet the child died just seven weeks later. Henry, writes Weir “like a wise prince, took this dolorous chance wondrous wisely and, the more to comfort the Queen, he made no great mourning outwardly. But the Queen, like a natural woman, made much lamentation”. Prince Henry was buried in a lavish funeral in Westminster Abbey.

Was the marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon a happy one?

Despite these personal tragedies, Catherine was an able and supportive consort to Henry and popular with her subjects, and it’s known that the couple rode and hunted together. The Spanish queen humoured her husband in all his chivalric games, writes John Edwards, and “at least pretended to be surprised by the charades in which he and his ‘noble’ friends sometimes engaged, including the occasion in which they invaded her chamber dressed as Robin Hood and his ‘Merry Men’”.

Did Catherine of Aragon fight at Flodden?

Catherine of Aragon also ruled as regent when Henry was fighting in France, and her army defeated the forces of King James IV of Scotland, husband of Catherine’s sister-in-law Margaret Tudor, at the battle of Flodden in 1513. James had attempted to take advantage of the English king’s absence by crossing the border into England at the head of a powerful army.

Catherine’s involvement in the victory has largely been written out of history, says Edwards, often restricted to a tongue-in-cheek remark she made to Henry’s minister Thomas Wolsey that she was confining herself to “making standards, banners and badges”. But in fact, while her husband was engaged in largely ineffective manoeuvres in north-eastern France, Catherine gave executive orders.

Catherine clearly revelled in the English win – so much so that she proposed sending King James’s embalmed and waxed corpse to Henry in France as grisly evidence of her triumph. Yet instead she told her husband that: “This battle hath been to your grace and all your realm the greatest honour that could be, and more than ye should win all the crown of France.”

Edwards writes that the victory at Flodden can be regarded as a high point in Catherine’s life. “Here was a queen who, almost from the day she arrived in England, had been a favourite of the English people. Here was a woman whose keen intellect had impressed some of the sharpest minds in 16th-century Europe. And now to these accomplishments could be added a display of grit, initiative and no little skill in the midst of a national emergency.”

Though Catherine did play a significant role in many diplomatic alliances of the Tudor age, she did not make the journey to France with Henry’s younger sister, Princess Mary Tudor, for her marriage to King Louis XII, as depicted in the drama. However, as alluded to in the show, in Mary’s retinue was Mary Boleyn, daughter of courtier Thomas and sister to Anne – both Boleyn daughters would later catch the eye of the king.

The Field of the Cloth of Gold: Did Henry VIII and Francis I wrestle?

The Field of the Cloth of Gold was a magnificent gathering – 18 days of revelry near Calais in June 1520, in which Henry VIII of England met with Francis I of France. It was a direct result of the Treaty of London, organised by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a pact of non-aggression between the major powers of Europe, including England, France and the Holy Roman Empire. Among the terms was the commitment that Henry and Francis would meet to affirm their friendship.

The revels marked a major milestone in the alliance between the two rulers, though the atmosphere was tense right up until the actual meeting. “The gold coats worn by the English party were briefly mistaken for armour”, reveals BBC History Revealed, “and all was paused until the French were reassured that Francis was in no danger. Then the kings doffed their caps and embraced each other as if old friends.”

Henry really did challenge the French king to a wrestling match, though seemingly not due to an insult, as in the drama. “Wrestling was the preferred entertainment when the weather turned sour. Completely unexpectedly, and after a few drinks, Henry challenged Francis to a wrestling match, but was easily defeated. He did, however, best the French king at archery.”

What happened during the Evil May Day riots?

In Part II, while Henry and Catherine attend the Field of the Cloth of Gold, Lina and Oviedo are caught in the midst of rising prejudice and tension towards foreigners in England, in the form of the Evil May Day Riots of 1517. This was a real event that rocked London in the 16th century. Sources disagree about what precisely sparked the riot, says Dr Joanne Paul, writing for HistoryExtra. “Witness and investigator Thomas More suggested that it was two lowly young apprentices who were looking to make trouble. The Tudor chronicler Edward Hall put the blame on the foreigners themselves they had boasted of their favour with the king and “disdained, mocked and oppressed the Englishmen”, from whom they had taken jobs.”

In reality, Catherine and Henry were not returning from France at this time and did not get caught up in the riots the royal family was 10 miles from the heart of London, at their palace in Richmond. But it is true that Catherine intervened to gain a pardon for 400 or so of the agitators. Though the head of one rioter, John Lincoln, was displayed as a reminder and a warning against further uprising.

Elsewhere in the series, as the actions against dissenters intensify, Lady Margaret ‘Maggie’ Pole discovers another side to her court ally, Thomas More. It is true that history has left us two versions of Thomas More, as Dr Joanne Paul writes, “the flawless Catholic saint, and the cruel ogre, hellbent on burning Protestants”.

“These two ‘Mores’ were the product of the divide between Protestants and Catholics,” explains Paul, “and emerged out of the decades that followed More’s death in 1535. As More’s extended family produced hagiographic biographies to convince the pope to make him a saint, Elizabethan chroniclers like Edward Hall and John Foxe painted More as a fool and fanatic. To borrow the words of 19th-century socialist Karl Kautsky: ‘To most of the biographies of More, a certain fragrance of incense clings.’ It can be difficult to see through the fog.”

How did Catherine and Henry VIII’s marriage end?

As their struggles to conceive a healthy male heir continued, Henry VIII turned to many mistresses, including Elizabeth ‘Bessie’ Blount (during Catherine’s first pregnancy he was also embroiled with Anne Hastings, sister of the Duke of Buckingham and a newly married member of Catherine’s household. Henry’s close friend William Compton appears to have acted as a go-between, although Anne later went on to have an affair with Compton himself. Henry sent her away from court in retaliation). Henry’s affairs produced a number of illegitimate offspring (though a son Henry Fitzroy, born to mistress Blount, was the only child to be acknowledged). Catherine was increasingly marginalised and eventually cast aside by 1527, in favour of her lady-in-waiting Anne Boleyn.

As Henry sought an annulment to his marriage, Catherine was subjected to a protracted process of humiliation and heartbreak while she fought to prove her fidelity to Henry and insist that she was the rightful queen. Edwards explains how Catherine “vociferously denied the accusations that she had had sexual relations with Prince Arthur during their short marriage – an assumption around which much of Henry’s case was built”. When Pope Clement VII refused to grant the annulment that he so desired, Henry’s infatuation with Anne sparked a break with papal obedience, a key catalyst for the English Reformation.

Henry officially married Anne Boleyn in January 1533, although they had probably already married secretly at Dover in November 1532. Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon wasn’t annulled by the newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, until May 1533.

How did Catherine of Aragon die?

Henry and Catherine were married for nearly 24 years, and she is today often known only in the children’s rhyme about Henry’s wives as ‘divorced’. Yet Catherine of Aragon also ‘survived’ for three years after the annulment of her marriage. However, she was banished from the king’s court and cruelly denied contact with her young daughter, Mary, even during her final illness (Henry did grant a visit from Catherine’s friend Eustace Chapuys, the Spanish ambassador to the Tudor court).

She died at the age of 50, of suspected heart cancer, on 7 January 1536 at Kimbolton Castle – just four months before Henry’s second wife met her horrifying and bloody end.

Catherine, in a grave marked ‘Dowager Princess of Wales’, was buried at Peterborough Abbey, now Peterborough Cathedral.

The Spanish PrincessParts 1 & 2 are available to watch on STARZ now, with a new episode released each Sunday from 11 October. Find out more here.

Elinor Evans is the deputy digital editor of HistoryExtra.


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What is the name of the king whose brother has been raised as a girl? - History

New International Version
"Who has stirred up one from the east, calling him in righteousness to his service? He hands nations over to him and subdues kings before him. He turns them to dust with his sword, to windblown chaff with his bow.

New Living Translation
“Who has stirred up this king from the east, rightly calling him to God’s service? Who gives this man victory over many nations and permits him to trample their kings underfoot? With his sword, he reduces armies to dust. With his bow, he scatters them like chaff before the wind.

English Standard Version
Who stirred up one from the east whom victory meets at every step? He gives up nations before him, so that he tramples kings underfoot he makes them like dust with his sword, like driven stubble with his bow.

Berean Study Bible
Who has aroused one from the east and called him to his feet in righteousness? He hands nations over to him and subdues kings before him. He turns them to dust with his sword, to windblown chaff with his bow.

King James Bible
Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to his foot, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings? he gave them as the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow.

New King James Version
“Who raised up one from the east? Who in righteousness called him to His feet? Who gave the nations before him, And made him rule over kings? Who gave them as the dust to his sword, As driven stubble to his bow?

New American Standard Bible
“Who has stirred one from the east Whom He calls in righteousness to His feet? He turns nations over to him And subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, Like the wind-driven chaff with his bow.

NASB 1995
"Who has aroused one from the east Whom He calls in righteousness to His feet? He delivers up nations before him And subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, As the wind-driven chaff with his bow.

NASB 1977
“Who has aroused one from the east Whom He calls in righteousness to His feet? He delivers up nations before him, And subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, As the wind-driven chaff with his bow.

Amplified Bible
“Who has stirred up and put into action one from the east [the king of Persia, Cyrus the Great] Whom He calls in righteousness to His service and whom victory meets at every step? The LORD turns nations over to him And subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, Like wind-driven chaff with his bow.

Christian Standard Bible
Who has stirred up someone from the east? In righteousness he calls him to serve. The LORD hands nations over to him, and he subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, like wind-driven stubble with his bow.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Who has stirred him up from the east? He calls righteousness to his feet. The LORD hands nations over to him, and he subdues kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, like wind-driven stubble with his bow.

American Standard Version
Who hath raised up one from the east, whom he calleth in righteousness to his foot? he giveth nations before him, and maketh him rule over kings he giveth them as the dust to his sword, as the driven stubble to his bow.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Who has awakened Righteousness from the East and called him to his feet? The nations shall be handed over before him and Kings shall fall down. He shall give his destruction like dust and like an archer whose bow bursts forth

Brenton Septuagint Translation
Who raised up righteousness from the east, and called it to his feet, so that it should go? shall appoint it an adversary of Gentiles, and shall dismay kings, and bury their swords in the earth, and cast forth their bows and arrows as sticks?

Contemporary English Version
Who appointed this ruler from the east? Who puts nations and kings in his power? His sword and his arrows turn them to dust blown by the wind.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Who hath raised up the just one from the east, hath called him to follow him? he shall give the nations in his sight, and he shall rule over kings: he shall give them as the dust to his sword, as stubble driven by the wind, to his bow.

English Revised Version
Who hath raised up one from the east, whom he calleth in righteousness to his foot? he giveth nations before him, and maketh him rule over kings he giveth them as the dust to his sword, as the driven stubble to his bow.

Good News Translation
"Who was it that brought the conqueror from the east and makes him triumphant wherever he goes? Who gives him victory over kings and nations? His sword strikes them down as if they were dust. His arrows scatter them like straw before the wind.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Who has raised up from the east someone to whom the LORD gives victory with every step he takes? Nations are handed over to him. He defeats kings. With his sword he turns them into dust. With his bow he turns them into straw blown by the wind.

International Standard Version
Who has aroused victory from the east, and has summoned it to his service, and has handed over nations to him? Who brings down kings, and turns them into dust with his sword, into windblown stubble with his bow?

JPS Tanakh 1917
Who hath raised up one from the east, At whose steps victory attendeth? He giveth nations before him, And maketh him rule over kings His sword maketh them as the dust, His bow as the driven stubble.

Literal Standard Version
Who stirred up a righteous one from the east? He calls him to His foot, "" He gives nations before him, "" And He causes him to rule kings, "" He gives [them] as dust [to] his sword, "" As driven stubble [to] his bow.

NET Bible
Who stirs up this one from the east? Who officially commissions him for service? He hands nations over to him, and enables him to subdue kings. He makes them like dust with his sword, like windblown straw with his bow.

New Heart English Bible
Who has raised up one from the east? Whom he called to his foot in righteousness? He hands over nations to him, and makes him rule over kings. He gives them like the dust to his sword, like the driven stubble to his bow.

World English Bible
Who has raised up one from the east? Who called him to his foot in righteousness? He hands over nations to him, and makes him rule over kings. He gives them like the dust to his sword, like the driven stubble to his bow.

Young's Literal Translation
Who stirred up from the east a righteous one? He calleth him to His foot, He giveth before him nations, And kings He causeth him to rule, He giveth them as dust to his sword, As driven stubble to his bow.

Revelation 7:2
And I saw another angel ascending from the east, with the seal of the living God. And he called out in a loud voice to the four angels who had been given power to harm the land and the sea:

Revelation 16:12
And the sixth angel poured out his bowl on the great river Euphrates, and its water was dried up to prepare the way for the kings of the East.

2 Samuel 22:43
I ground them as the dust of the earth I crushed and trampled them like mud in the streets.

2 Chronicles 36:23
"This is what Cyrus king of Persia says: 'The LORD, the God of heaven, who has given me all the kingdoms of the earth, has appointed me to build a house for Him at Jerusalem in Judah. Whoever among you belongs to His people, may the LORD his God be with him, and may he go up.'"

Ezra 1:2
"This is what Cyrus king of Persia says: 'The LORD, the God of heaven, who has given me all the kingdoms of the earth, has appointed me to build a house for Him at Jerusalem in Judah.

Isaiah 40:24
No sooner are they planted, no sooner are they sown, no sooner have their stems taken root in the ground, than He blows on them and they wither, and a whirlwind sweeps them away like stubble.

Isaiah 41:3
He pursues them, going on safely, hardly touching the path with his feet.

Isaiah 41:25
I have raised up one from the north, and he has come--one from the east who calls on My name. He will march over rulers as if they were mortar, like a potter who treads the clay.

Isaiah 42:6
"I, the LORD, have called you for a righteous purpose, and I will take hold of your hand. I will keep you and appoint you to be a covenant for the people and a light to the nations,

Isaiah 45:1
This is what the LORD says to Cyrus His anointed, whose right hand I have grasped to subdue nations before him, to disarm kings, to open the doors before him, so that the gates will not be shut:

Isaiah 45:13
I will raise up Cyrus in righteousness, and I will make all his ways straight. He will rebuild My city and set My exiles free, but not for payment or reward, says the LORD of Hosts."

Isaiah 46:11
I summon a bird of prey from the east, a man for My purpose from a far-off land. Truly I have spoken, and truly I will bring it to pass. I have planned it, and I will surely do it.

Isaiah 48:15
I, even I, have spoken yes, I have called him. I have brought him, and he will succeed in his mission.

Lamentations 1:15
The Lord has rejected all the mighty men in my midst He has summoned an army against me to crush my young warriors. Like grapes in a winepress, the Lord has trampled the Virgin Daughter of Judah.

Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to his foot, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings? he gave them as the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow.

Isaiah 41:25 I have raised up one from the north, and he shall come: from the rising of the sun shall he call upon my name: and he shall come upon princes as upon morter, and as the potter treadeth clay.

Isaiah 45:13 I have raised him up in righteousness, and I will direct all his ways: he shall build my city, and he shall let go my captives, not for price nor reward, saith the LORD of hosts.

Isaiah 46:11 Calling a ravenous bird from the east, the man that executeth my counsel from a far country: yea, I have spoken it, I will also bring it to pass I have purposed it, I will also do it.

Isaiah 45:1 Thus saith the LORD to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have holden, to subdue nations before him and I will loose the loins of kings, to open before him the two leaved gates and the gates shall not be shut

Genesis 14:14,15 And when Abram heard that his brother was taken captive, he armed his trained servants, born in his own house, three hundred and eighteen, and pursued them unto Dan…

Ezra 1:2 Thus saith Cyrus king of Persia, The LORD God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth and he hath charged me to build him an house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah.

Isaiah 41:15,16 Behold, I will make thee a new sharp threshing instrument having teeth: thou shalt thresh the mountains, and beat them small, and shalt make the hills as chaff…

2 Samuel 22:43 Then did I beat them as small as the dust of the earth, I did stamp them as the mire of the street, and did spread them abroad.

2 Kings 13:7 Neither did he leave of the people to Jehoahaz but fifty horsemen, and ten chariots, and ten thousand footmen for the king of Syria had destroyed them, and had made them like the dust by threshing.

Isaiah 40:24 Yea, they shall not be planted yea, they shall not be sown: yea, their stock shall not take root in the earth: and he shall also blow upon them, and they shall wither, and the whirlwind shall take them away as stubble.

He gave them. --Better, He giveth them, the future seen as present. The LXX. and some modern critics follow a reading which gives, he maketh them as dust, their sword as stubble.

Verse 2. - Who raised up the righteous man , etc.? rather, who raised up from the East one whom righteousness will call to his foot. It is generally agreed among moderns that the reference is to Cyrus, who is further referred to in ver. 25, in Isaiah 44:28 Isaiah 45:1-4, 13 and Isaiah 46:11. Cyrus, whether we regard him as King of Persia, or as King of Elam (Susiana), would come from a land lying east of Babylon. "Righteousness called him to his foot" when God, the Righteous One, made him his minister, and gave him a certain task to perform (Isaiah 44:28). Gave the nations before him rather, gives , or will give. (On the rapid conquests of Cyrus, see Herod., 1:75-191 and comp. 'Ancient Monarchies,' vol. 4. pp. 354-377.) That he was God's instrument must be admitted by all who allow that the course of history is determined by a superintending Providence. Made him rule over kings . Mr. Cheyne translates, "makes him trample upon kings," which seems to give the true sense. It was certainly not the general policy of Cyrus to establish under him a number of subject kings, but rather to rule the conquered countries by means of Persian or Median governors (see Herod., 1:153, 156 'Transactions of the Society of Bibl. Archaeol.,' vol. 7. p. 166) He gave them as the dust to his sword , etc. or, according to some, he maketh their sword as dust , and their bow as driven stubble. The result is the same, whichever we regard as the true construction. The prophecy tells of the ease and completeness with which Cyrus vanquished his enemies.

Who
מִ֤י (mî)
Interrogative
Strong's 4310: Who?, whoever, in oblique construction with prefix, suffix

He hands nations
גּוֹיִם֙ (gō·w·yim)
Noun - masculine plural
Strong's 1471: A foreign nation, a Gentile, a troop of animals, a flight of locusts

[and] subdues
יַ֔רְדְּ (yard)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect Jussive - third person masculine singular
Strong's 7287: To tread down, subjugate, to crumble off

He turns
יִתֵּ֤ן (yit·tên)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 5414: To give, put, set

with his sword,
חַרְבּ֔וֹ (ḥar·bōw)
Noun - feminine singular construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 2719: Drought, a cutting instrument, as a, knife, sword


Male Viking Names

Now for the guys! Many of these names are taken directly from Norse gods. Some of these are well-known thanks to the popular culture of today, others less so. Whether you prefer a popular name or one less familiar, you'll find something for you on this list.

Thor/Tor

The hammer-wielding god of thunder and lightning – or the handsome, tight clad saviour of American pop-culture either way you look at it Thor is a pretty heroic name for your little dude.

You will receive thunderous applause for authenticity if you go with the Scandinavian spelling Tor, pronounced more or less as it’s spelled.

Tor Erling Staff was a Norwegian barrister known for taking on controversial cases, Tor Mikkel Wara is a Norwegian politician who became Minister of Justice and Public Security in 2018, and Tor Endresen is a Norwegian singer who represented Norway in the 1997 Eurovision Song Contest.

While Freya is the name of every other female husky, Loki is the male equivalent. Originally, Loki was the trickster god in Norse mythology. Of course, Loki appears in the Marvel cinematic universe as an antihero, often in conflict with Thor.

Loki's relation with the gods varies by source. He occupied a ‘moral middle ground', sometimes assisting the gods and other times behaving with malice. If your little one seems to have a split personality, perhaps this is the name for them!

Bjørn

What could be cooler than the name Bear? Yes, as in the animal, as this is the direct translation from Norwegian to English. This name has seen a rise in popularity after the Vikings TV series, but has been a staple in Norway for… well… ever.

The name is often written simply as ‘Bjorn' in English even though ø and o are different letters, and therefore different sounds, in Norwegian. Speak to a Norwegian to get the true sound, but to get you started it's closer to ‘bjurn' than ‘bjorn'.

Add Ivar to the list of names made popular by the Vikings TV series. The name has a rich history among Kings, warriors, and other famous figures of folklore. Its meaning can best be described as ‘bow warrior', or archer.

Ivar is not as common as a name today in Scandinavia as it once was. That said, it is also the source of the Scottish name Ivor, which is more common on the British Isles.

Per Ivar Staberg is a former Norwegian football referee and player, while Ivar Johannes Koteng is a Norwegian businessman and chairman of Rosenborg football club.

The highest and most complex of all the gods from Norse mythology, Odin reined over art, war, wisdom, and death.

Perhaps because of Odin's role in folklore, the name hasn’t survived well over the centuries. Nevertheless, for the main dude in your life, the name Odin is hard to match.

Odin Staveland is a Norwegian musician and composer, while Odin Thiago Holm is a teenage footballer from Trondheim who signed for Oslo side Vålerenga in 2019,

Harold/Harald

Yet another name of kings, including the current monarch in Norway: Kong Harald V. This name remains popular today: though is often shortened to Harry in many countries.

Harald Hårfagre (Harald Fairhair) is portrayed by medieval Icelandic historians as the first King of Norway. Much of what we think we know about this famous Harald is based on sagas that were written long after his death.

Knut translates to knot and has been a popular name throughout Scandinavia and Europe for some time. A number of royals have lived under this name, including a prince of Denmark who defeated the kind of England in the 11 th century to become the king of Norway, Denmark, and England.

The Norwegian writer Knut Hamsun won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1920. Knut Bjørnsen was a speed skater who turned professional sports commentator for national broadcaster NRK.

Ragnar

A popular Viking name all across Scandinavia, Ragnar was made popular internationally by the success of the Vikings TV show and its lead character Ragnar “Lothbrok” Sigurdsson.

Other famous Ragnars include wartime politician Ragnar Sigvald Skancke, and Ragnar Frisch, the co-recipient of the first Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

Magnus

Many a Viking and many a modern-day Scandinavian go by this name. Its original translation means ‘great’, which sheds light on why there are so many kings named Magnus.

Regardless of if you have plans for your family to ascend to the throne, Magnus makes a pretty sweet name for creatures, big or small.

Made famous by the Nordic explorer Leif Ericsson, who reached North America sometime in the 11 th century. This named has remained prevalent across the globe to the modern day, especially in the USA.

Leif Juster was a hugely popular Norwegian comedian, singer and actor, while Leif Garrett is an American singer, actor, and TV star.

Inspired? Why not share this post on Pinterest? There's a pin for that…

About Bradley Kurtz

Bradley Kurtz in an American freelance writer living in Trondheim.


Weaknesses

It underestimates and scorns all of mankind. In many cases, it leaves an open escape route for victims and lets them run away. Because of this narcissism, It makes mistakes and does illogical things.

The presence of courage and heart are Its main weaknesses. This appears to have a psychological effect that instills fear and enables it the inability to function properly in its physical form.

Given that it feeds on fear, it makes sense that courage and heart can overcome it. Once the Losers are united, their strong shared will and love for each other successfully overpowers It. This allows them to form a psychic connection and "send power" to each other, even across distances.

It can be taken by surprise and can be physically assaulted if the attacker demonstrates no fear of it. Additionally, "belief" can affect It, such as the use of silver (which is a fictional weakness of supernatural entities) and an inhaler believed to contain battery acid.

The novel states that It must obey the laws of its form. This means that It possesses the vulnerabilities of whatever form it take, such as a vampire's vulnerability to sunlight or winged leeches obeying physics of flight.

During times of hibernation or healing, It may be vulnerable to surprise attacks. However, other books in the Stephen King universe (such as Dreamcatcher and Hearts in Atlantis) imply that IT may still be alive at the end of the story.

Other beings like Gan, who is superior to It, and Maturin, who is its equal, could kill It.


GLOSSARY OF NAMES

A SHORT description of the gods and of other persons and places mentioned in the Epic will be found in this Glossary. The gods were credited at different times with a variety of attributes and characteristics, sometimes contradictory only such as are relevant to the material of the Gilgamesh Epic are given here. The small number of gods and other characters who play a more important part in the story are described in the introduction in their case a page reference to this description is given at the end of the Glossary note. Cross-references to other entries in the Glossary are indicated by means of italics.

ADAD: Storm-, rain-, and weather-god.

ANUNNAKI: Usually gods of the underworld, judges of the dead and offspring of Anu.

ANSHAN: A district of Elam in south-west Persia probably the source o£ supplies of wood for making bows. Gilgamesh has a 'bow of Anshan'.

ANU: Sumerian An father of gods, and god of the firmament, the 'great above'. In the Sumerian cosmogony there was, first of all, the primeval sea, from which was born the cosmic mountain consisting of heaven, 'An', and earth, 'Ki' they were separated by Enlil, then An carried off the heavens, and Enlil the earth. Ann later retreated more and more into the background he had an important temple in Uruk.

APSU: The Abyss the primeval waters under the earth in the later mythology of the Enuma Elish, more particularly the sweet water which mingled with the bitter waters of the sea and with a third watery element, perhaps cloud, from which the first gods were engendered. The waters of Apsu were thought of as held immobile underground by the 'spell' of Ea in a death-like sleep.

ARURU: A goddess of creation, she created Enkidu from clay in the image of Anu.

AYA: The dawn, the bride of the Sun God Shamash.

BELIT-SHERI: Scribe and recorder of the underworld gods:

BULL of HEAVEN: A personification of drought created by Anu for Ishtar.

DILMUN: The Sumerian paradise, perhaps the Persian Gulf sometimes described as 'the place where the sun rises' and 'the Land of the Living' the scene of a Sumerian creation myth and the place where the deified Sumerian hero of the flood, Ziusudra, was taken by the gods to live for ever. See p. 39.

DUMUZI: The Sumerian form of Tammuz a god of vegetation and fertility, and so of the underworld, also called 'the Shepherd and 'lord of the sheepfolds'. As the companion of Ningizzida 'to all eternity' he stands at the gate of heaven. In the Sumerian 'Descent of Inanna' he is the husband of the goddess Inanna, the Sumerian counterpart of Ishtar. According to the Sumerian King-List Gilgamesh was descended from 'Dumuzi a shepherd'.

EA: Sumerian Enki god of the sweet waters, also of wisdom, a patron of arts and one of the creators of mankind, towards whom he is usually well-disposed. The chief god of Eridu, where he had a temple, he lived 'in the deep' his ancestry is uncertain, but he was probably a child of Anu.

EANNA: The temple precinct in Uruk sacred to Anu and Ishtar.

EGALMAH: The 'Great Palace' in Uruk, the home of the goddess Ninsun, the mother of Gilgamesh.

ENDUSUGGA: With Nindukugga, Sumerian gods living in the underworld parents of Enlil.

ENKIDU: Moulded by Aruru, goddess of creation, out of clay is the image and 'of the essence of Anu', the sky-god, and of Ninurta the war-god. The companion of Gilgamesh, he is wild or natural reran he was later considered a patron or god of anima b and may have been the hero of another cycle. See P. 30.

ENLIL: God of earth, wind, and the universal air, ultimately spirit the executive of Anu. In the Sumerian cosmogony he was born of the union of An heaven, and Ki earth. These he separated, and he then carried off earth as his portion. In later times he supplanted Anu as chief god. He was the patron of the city of Nippur. See p. 24.

ENNUGI: God of irrigation and inspector of Canals.

ENUMA ELLISH: The Semitic creation epic which describes the creation of the gods, the defeat of the powers of chaos by the young god Marduk, and the creation of man from the blood of Kingu, the defeated champion of chaos. The title is taken from the first words of the epic 'When on high'.

ERESHKIGAL: The Queen of the underworld, a counterpart of Persephone probably once a sky-goddess. In the Sumerian cosmogony she was carried off to the underworld after the separation of heaven and earth. See p. 27.

ETANA: Legendary king of Kish who reigned after the flood in the epic which bears his name he was carried to heaven on the back of an eagle.

GILGAMESH: The hero of the Epic son of the goddess Ninsun and of a priest of Kullab, fifth king of Uruk after the flood, famous as a great builder and as a judge of the dead. A cycle of epic poems has collected round his name.

HANISH: A divine herald of storm and bad weather.

HUMBABA: Also Huwawa a guardian of the cedar forest who opposes Gilgamesh and is killed by him and Enkidu. A nature divinity, perhaps an Anatolian, Elamite, or Syrian god. See p. 32.

IGIGI: Collective name for the great gods of heaven.

IRKALLA: Another name for Ereshkigal the Queen of the underworld.

ISHTAR: Sumerian Inanna the goddess of love and fertility, also goddess of war, called the Queen of Heaven. She is the daughter of Anu and patroness of Uruk, where she has a temple. See p. 25.

ISHULLANA: The: gardener of Anu, once loved by Ishtar whom he rejected he was turned by her into a mole or frog.

LUGULEANDA: Third king of the post-diluvian dynasty of Uruk, a god and shepherd, and hero of a cycle of Sumerian poems protector of Gilgamesh.

MAGAN: A land to the west of Mesopotamia, sometimes Egypt or Arabia, and sometimes the land of the dead, the underworld:

MAGILUM: Uncertain meaning, perhaps 'the boat of the dead'.

MAMMETUM: Ancestral goddess responsible for destinies.

MAN-SCORPION: Guardian, with a similar female monster, of the mountain into which the sun descends at nightfall. Shown on sealings and ivory inlays as a figure with the upper part of the body human and the lower part ending in a scorpion's mil. According to the Enuma Elish created by the primeval waters in order to fight the gods.

MASHU: The word means 'twins' in the Akkadian language. A mountain with twin peaks into which the sun descends at nightfall and from which it returns at dawn. Sometimes thought of as Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon.

NAMTAR: Fate, destiny in its evil aspect pictured as a demon of the underworld, also a messenger and chief minister of Ereshkigal a bringer of disease and pestilence.

NERGAL: Underworld god, sometimes the husband of Ereshkigal, he is the subject of an Akkadian poem which describes his translation from heaven to the underworld plague-god.

NETI: The Sumerian form of Nedu, the chief gatekeeper in the

NINDUKUGGA: With Endukugga, parental gods living in the underworld:

NINGAL: Wife of the Moon God and mother of the Sun.

NINGIESU: An earlier form of Ninurta god of irrigation and fertility, he had a field near Lagash where all sorts of plants flourished he was the child of a she-goat.

NINGIZZIDA: Also Gizzida a fertility god, addressed as 'Lord of the Tree of Life' sometimes he is a serpent with human head, but later he was a god of healing and magic the companion of Tammuz, with whom he stood at the gate of heaven.

NINHURSAG: Sumerian mother-goddess one of the four principal Sumerian gods with An, Enlil, and Enki sometimes the wife of Enki, she created all vegetation. The name means 'the Mother' she is also called 'Nintu', lady of birth, and IG, the earth.

NINKI: The 'mother' of Enlil, probably a form of Ninhursag.

NINLIL: Goddess of heaven, earth, and air and in one aspect of the underworld wife of Enlil and mother of the Moon worshipped with Enlil in Nippur.

NINSUM The mother of Gilgamesh, a minor goddess whose house was in Uruk she was noted for wisdom, and was the wife of Lugulbaada.

NINURTA: The later forth of Ningirsu a warrior and god of war, a herald, the south wind, and god of wells and irrigation. According to one poem he once dammed up the bitter waters of the underworld and conquered various monsters.

NISIR: Probably means 'Mountain of Salvation' sometimes identified with the Pir Oman Gudrun range south. of the lower Zab, or with the biblical Ararat north of Lake Van.

PUZUR-AMURRI: The steersman of Utnapishtim during the flood.

SEVEN SAGES: Wise men who brought civilization to the seven oldest cities of Mesopotamia.

SHAMASH: Sumerian Utu the sun for the Sumerians he was principally the judge and law-giver with some fertility attributes. For the Semites he was also a victorious warrior, the god of wisdom, the son of Sin, and 'greater than his father'. He was the husband and brother of Ishtar. He is represented with the saw with which he cuts decisions. In the poems 'Shamash' may mean the god, or simply the sun.

SHULLAT: A divine herald of storm and of bad weather.

SHULPAE: A god who presided over feasts and feasting.

SHURRUPAX: Modem Fara, eighteen miles north-west of Uruk one of the oldest cities of Mesopotamia, and one of the five named by the Sumerians as having existed before the flood. The home of the hero of the flood story.

SIDURI: The divine wine-maker and brewer she lives on the shore of the sea (perhaps the Mediterranean), in the garden of the sun. Her name in the Hurrian language means 'young woman' and she may be a form of Ishtar.

SILILI: The mother of the stallion a divine mare?

SIN: Sumerian Nama, the moon. The chief Sumerian astral deity, the father of Utu-Shamash, the sun, and of Ishtar. Ills parents were Enlil and Ninlil. His chief temple was in Ur.

TAMMUZ: Sumerian Dunuzi the dying god of vegetation, bewailed by Ishtar, the subject of laments and litanies. In an Akkadian poem Ishtar descends to the underworld in search of her young husband Tammuz but in the Sumerian poem on which this is based it is Inanna herself who is responsible for sending Dumuzi to the underworld because of his pride and as a hostage for her own safe return.

UBARA-TUTU: A king of Shurrupak and father of Utnapishtim The only king of Kish named in the prediluvian Ring-List, apart from Utnapishtim.

URSHANABI: Old Babylonian Sursunabu the boatman of Utnapishtim who ferries daily across the waters of death which divide the garden of the sun from the paradise where Utnapishtim lives for ever (the Sumerian Dilmun). By accepting Gilgamesh as a passenger he forfeits this right, and accompanies Gilgamesh back to Uruk instead.

URUK: Biblical Erech, modem Warka, in southern Babylonia between Fara (Shutrupak) and Ur. Shown by excavation to have been an important city from very early times, with great temples to the gods Anu and Ishtar. Traditionally the enemy of the city of Kish, and after the flood the seat of a dynasty of kings, among whom Gilgamesh was the fifth and most famous.

UTNAPISHTIM: Old Babylonian Utanapishtim, Sumerian Ziusudra in the Sumerian poems he is a wise king and priest of Shurrupak in the Akkadian sources he is a wise citizen of Shurrupak. He is the son of Ubara Tutu, and his name is usually translated, 'He Who Saw Life'. He is the protege of the god Ea, by whose connivance he Survives the flood, with his family and with 'the seed of all living creatures' afterwards he is taken by the gods to live for ever at 'the mouth of the rivers' and given the epithet 'Faraway' or according to the Sumerians he lives in Dihnun where the sun rises


What is the name of the king whose brother has been raised as a girl? - History

New International Version
Abishai the brother of Joab was chief of the Three. He raised his spear against three hundred men, whom he killed, and so he became as famous as the Three.

New Living Translation
Abishai, the brother of Joab, was the leader of the Thirty. He once used his spear to kill 300 enemy warriors in a single battle. It was by such feats that he became as famous as the Three.

English Standard Version
Now Abishai, the brother of Joab, was chief of the thirty. And he wielded his spear against 300 men and killed them and won a name beside the three.

Berean Study Bible
Now Abishai, the brother of Joab, was chief of the Three, and he lifted his spear against three hundred men, killed them, and won a name along with the Three.

King James Bible
And Abishai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three: for lifting up his spear against three hundred, he slew them, and had a name among the three.

New King James Version
Abishai the brother of Joab was chief of another three. He had lifted up his spear against three hundred men, killed them, and won a name among these three.

New American Standard Bible
As for Abshai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the thirty, and he wielded his spear against three hundred and killed them and he had a name as well as the thirty.

NASB 1995
As for Abshai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the thirty, and he swung his spear against three hundred and killed them and he had a name as well as the thirty.

NASB 1977
As for Abshai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the thirty, and he swung his spear against three hundred and killed them and he had a name as well as the thirty.

Amplified Bible
Abishai the brother of Joab was chief of the [other] three, and he lifted up his spear against three hundred and killed them, and he had a name as well as the three.

Christian Standard Bible
Abishai, Joab’s brother, was the leader of the Three. He raised his spear against three hundred men and killed them, gaining a reputation among the Three.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Abishai, Joab's brother, was the leader of the Three. He raised his spear against 300 men and killed them, gaining a reputation among the Three.

American Standard Version
And Abishai, the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three for he lifted up his spear against three hundred and slew them, and had a name among the three.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And Abishi the brother of Yoab was Chief of thirty, and he drew a lance against three hundred killed, and he had honor over the thirty.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
And Abisa the brother of Joab, he was chief of three: he drew his sword against three hundred slain at one time, and he had a name among the second three.

Contemporary English Version
Joab's brother Abishai was the leader of the Thirty Warriors, and in one battle he killed 300 men with his spear. He was just as famous as the Three Warriors

Douay-Rheims Bible
And Abisai the brother of Joab, he was chief of three, and he lifted up his spear against three hundred whom he slew, and he was renowned among the three,

English Revised Version
And Abishai, the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three: for he lifted up his spear against three hundred and slew them, and had a name among the three.

Good News Translation
Joab's brother Abishai was the leader of "The Famous Thirty." He fought with his spear against three hundred men and killed them, and became famous among "The Thirty."

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Joab's brother Abishai was the leader of the thirty. He used his spear to kill 300 men, but he was not one of the three,

International Standard Version
Joab's brother Abishai was the lieutenant in charge of the platoons. He used his spear to fight and kill 300 men, gaining a reputation distinct from the Three.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And Abishai, the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three for he lifted up his spear against three hundred and slew them, and had a name among the three.

Literal Standard Version
And Abishai brother of Joab, he has been head of the three: and he is lifting up his spear against three hundred—wounded, and has a name among three.

NET Bible
Abishai the brother of Joab was head of the three elite warriors. He killed three hundred men with his spear and gained fame along with the three elite warriors.

New Heart English Bible
And Abishai, the brother of Joab, was leader of the Thirty. And he wielded his spear against three hundred and killed them, and had a name beside the Three.

World English Bible
Abishai, the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three for he lifted up his spear against three hundred and killed them, and had a name among the three.

Young's Literal Translation
And Abishai brother of Joab, he hath been head of the three: and he is lifting up his spear against three hundred -- wounded, and hath a name among three.

2 Samuel 23:18
Now Abishai, the brother of Joab and son of Zeruiah, was chief of the Three, and he lifted his spear against three hundred men, killed them, and won a name along with the Three.

1 Chronicles 11:19
saying, "Far be it from me, my God, to do this! How can I drink the blood of these men who risked their lives?" Because they had brought it at the risk of their lives, David refused to drink it. Such were the exploits of the three mighty men.

1 Chronicles 11:21
He was doubly honored above the Three, and he became their commander, even though he was not included among the Three.

And Abishai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three: for lifting up his spear against three hundred, he slew them, and had a name among the three.

1 Chronicles 2:16 Whose sisters were Zeruiah, and Abigail. And the sons of Zeruiah Abishai, and Joab, and Asahel, three.

1 Samuel 26:6 Then answered David and said to Ahimelech the Hittite, and to Abishai the son of Zeruiah, brother to Joab, saying, Who will go down with me to Saul to the camp? And Abishai said, I will go down with thee.

2 Samuel 2:18 And there were three sons of Zeruiah there, Joab, and Abishai, and Asahel: and Asahel was as light of foot as a wild roe.

(20) Abishai the brother of Joab. --Heb., Abshai, but in Samuel, Abishai. (Comp. Abram and Abiram.) Samuel adds "son of Zeruiah" after Joab. (Comp. 1Chronicles 2:16 and 1Chronicles 18:12 1Chronicles 19:11 ff. for other deeds of Abishai.)

He was chief of the three. --Apparently the second triad, one of whose famous exploits has just been related (1Chronicles 11:15-19). The Hebrew text of Samuel seems to read "knights," but some MSS., the Hebrew margin, and all the versions, agree with Chronicles.

For lifting up . . . --Literally, and he had bran. dished his spear over three hundred slain. The exploit of Jashobeam (1Chronicles 11:11).

And had a name among the three. --That is, among the second triad, of which he was captain.

Verse 20. - Abishai. was chief of the three . It is remarkable that again the name of one of the three is wanting, even if we take Benaiah of ver. 22 for the second.

was
הָיָה֙ (hā·yāh)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

and he
ה֤וּא (hū)
Pronoun - third person masculine singular
Strong's 1931: He, self, the same, this, that, as, are

killed [them],
חָלָ֑ל (ḥā·lāl)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 2490: To bore, to wound, to dissolve, to profane, to break, to begin, to play


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