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Albert Geldard

Albert Geldard


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Albert Geldard was born in Bradford on 11th April 1914. He attended Whetley Lane School and at the age of 13 he played for England schoolboys against Scotland and Wales. The following year he won his third cap against Ireland.

In June 1928 Geldard joined Bradford Park Avenue. When he made his debut in September 1929 he was only 15 years, 156 days old, a record for the Football League. He scored 6 goals in 34 games for Bradford before joining Everton in November 1932.

Everton reached the 1933 FA Cup Final. The team that lined up against Manchester City included Geldard, Dixie Dean, Ted Sager and Cliff Britton. Everton won the game 3-0.

Geldard won his first international cap for England against Italy on 13th May, 1933. The England team that day also included: Cliff Bastin, Wilf Copping and Eddie Hapgood. The game ended in a 1-1 draw. The following week Geldard retained his place in the team against Switzerland. England won the game 4-0.

In December, 1936, Everton signed Tommy Lawton for a fee of £6,500. Geldard soon developed a good partnership with Lawton and supplied him with the crosses for many of his headed goals. Tony Matthews in Who's Who of Everton points out that Geldard "was a slippery customer who possessed an exceptional turn of speed, could shoot with both feet and enjoyed taking on opponents, either on the outside or inside."

Geldard won his fourth and last international cap for England against Northern Ireland on 23rd October, 1937. England won the game 5-1. Geldard had never let his country down but unfortunately he played in the same position as the great Stanley Matthews.

After scoring 38 goals in 180 games for Everton Geldard was transferred to Bolton Wanderers for £4,500 in July 1938. Tommy Lawton was very upset by the decision to sell Geldard: "He was the fastest thing on two legs over ten yards. We had other wingers like Torry Gillick, Wally Boyes and Jimmy Caskie, but Albert had played for England only the season before, when he'd kept Stan Matthews out of the team. I thought we'd miss him."

On 15th March, 1939, Adolf Hitler ordered the German Army to invade Czechoslovakia. It seemed that war was inevitable. On 8th April, Bolton Wanderers played a home game against Sunderland. Before the game started, Harry Goslin, the team captain, spoke to the crowd: "We are facing a national emergency. But this danger can be met, if everybody keeps a cool head, and knows what to do. This is something you can't leave to the other fellow, everybody has a share to do."

To show their committment to the cause, Albert Geldard, Harry Goslin, Jackie Roberts, Don Howe, Ray Westwood, Walter Sidebottom, Ernie Forrest, Jack Hurst, Stan Hanson, Billy Ithell, Danny Winter, George Caterall, Sid Jones, Charlie Hanks, Val Thompson and Tommy Sinclair decided to join the military or police service.

The outbreak of the Second World War brought a halt to the Football League. Geldard returned to Bolton Wanderers after the war but retired from the game in May 1947.

Albert Geldard died in 1989.


The story starts on the 30th October 1935, when Mr. Albert Geldard and Mr. Theo Perlman established a company called Electrical Appliances (Pty) Ltd with the primary focus being that of selling imported electrical components to the motor industry.
Mr. Perlman’s health deteriorated dramatically during the Second World War which prompted him to resign from the company. Mr. Perlman"s place was taken by Mr. Maynard Marias and subsequently the company rebranded itself changing from Electrical Appliances (Pty) Ltd to Gelmar (Pty) Ltd (the eponymous company name reflecting the names of Mr. Geldard and Mr. Marias). The company’s priority broadened to include fishing tackle, sports and miscellaneous hobby equipment sales.
During the course of 1951 Mr. Marias resigned from Gelmar (Pty) Ltd which saw Mr. Geldard running the business on his own until 1966 when his son, Mr. Bob Geldard, joined the company. At this time, the company accommodated machine and furniture fitting manufacturers as well as a wood-working range.

Mr. Albert Geldard passed away during the year of 1971.

Mr. Bob Geldard assumed full control of the company after his father’s passing and since then Gelmar (Pty) Ltd has gradually broadened its activities to become kitchen and furniture fitting specialists whilst retaining its agency operations. To date we have over 300 empolyees as well as 35 brick and mortar store including 5 distributors thoughtout South Africa, and a distributor in Windhoek (Namibia).

Gelmar Argus newpaper supplement with Mr. Bob Geldard - 1987.


Geldard Albert Image 6 Everton 1935

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Bradford, Yorkshire born outside right Albert Geldard played his youth football with Bradford Schools and Manningham Mills in 1929 before he joined Second Division Bradford Park Avenue as a professional on 1st September 1929. His Football League debut came against Millwall at The Den on 16th September, so becoming the youngest player to appear in the Football League at just 15 years and 158 days old. He left Bradford Park Avenue having scored six goals in 34 matches over three years at the club, signing for First Division club Everton on 14th November 1932 for a then record fee of £4,000. His Toffees debut came at Middlesbrough where he scored in a 2-0 win and also on his home debut in a 2-2 draw with Bolton Wanderers a week later. In his first season he went to Wembley with Everton and emerged with an FA Cup winner’s medal as they beat Manchester City 3-0 in the 1933 FA Cup Final, with Geldard’s cross making the third goal. In October he played in the 1933 FA Charity Shield as Everton were beaten 3-0 by League Champions Arsenal at Goodison Park.

Geldard was first called up for England in May 1933 aged 19 when he played in a 1-1 draw against Italy in Rome, winning his second cap a week later against Switzerland in Berne. He won 2 further England caps in a defeat to Scotland at Hampden Park in April 1935 and in a 5-1 win over Ireland in Belfast in October 1937. He also represented The Football League on one occasion, playing as they beat The Irish League 3-0 at Bloomfield Road, Blackpool in October 1937.

Historian Tony Matthews described him thus: “Geldard was a slippery customer who possessed an exceptional turn of speed, could shoot with both feet and enjoyed taking on opponents, either on the outside or inside.” Taking part in the “cup tie of the century” on 30th January 1935, Geldard scored two goals to help Everton progress into the fifth round of the 1935 FA Cup after their 6-4 defeat of Sunderland.

After 37 goals in 180 matches for Everton over six seasons at Goodison Park, Bolton Wanderers signed Geldard for £7,000 in July 1938, and his debut came against Charlton Athletic on 27th August 1938, and he scored his first goal for The Trotters on 18th February 1939 against his former club Everton. Tommy Lawton was disappointed at the trade of Geldard saying “He was the fastest thing on two legs over ten yards. We had other wingers like Torry Gillick, Wally Boyes and Jimmy Caskie, but Albert had played for England only the season before, when he’d kept Stan Matthews out of the team. I thought we’d miss him.”

But only just after a year after his Bolton transfer his career was interrupted by the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939. He was enlisted in the 53rd Field Regiment Royal Artillery (Bolton Artillery) in May 1939 to fight along with 14 of his Bolton team mates, after a single goal in only 24 matches for The Trotters and during the War he represented The Army at football. He returned from the War to play for Bolton in their 1946 FA Cup campaign when they reached the FA Cup semi-final, which he played in as they lost to Charlton Athletic at Villa Park, and in total he played 18 more matches for The Trotters, scoring once more, but was forced to retire from professional football after a knee injury in May 1947. He later played for Lancashire Combination club Darwen joining them in December 1949 before his eventual retirement.

NB although published in 1935 this appears to be the same image as his 1932 Bradford Park Avenue photograph, see Image 1.


You've only scratched the surface of Geldard family history.

Between 1964 and 2004, in the United States, Geldard life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1983, and highest in 1999. The average life expectancy for Geldard in 1964 was 66, and 84 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Geldard ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


Networking with Geldard Researchers

In the course of genealogy research, collaboration is key -- we really cannot do it alone, and one of the great benefits of participating in community message boards is building relationships that not only enlightens our research but strengthens bonds across the miles. The article "Looking for John Smith - Focusing a Query" provides some valuable tips for posting successful Geldard queries.

You may also want to consider posting a query to the Community Message Boards at Genealogy Today to get assistance from other researchers on your most elusive Geldard ancestors.


Barnsley schoolboy makes history

Boss Simon Davey said the youngster, who was due back at school on Wednesday, was too young to be paid.

Noble-Lazarus came off the bench during his side's 3-0 defeat at Ipswich to beat the record by 113 days.

He passed a mark set by Bradford Park Avenue's Albert Geldard in 1929 and equalled by Wrexham's Ken Roberts.

Roberts was aged 15 years and 158 days when he made his debut in 1951.

Davey joked that Noble-Lazarus would receive a ham sandwich and a piece of pizza for his efforts.

He said the player would receive money as an apprentice once he has finished his GCSE exams next years.

"He has only trained a couple of times with the first team but they have taken him under their wing," the manager continued.

The club has liaised with his school so he can join first-team training on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Wearing a number 31 shirt, the teenager came on as a substitute in the 84th minute at Portman Road.

Davey insisted Noble-Lazarus, who goes to school in Huddersfield, would be kept grounded.

"I think if they're good enough, they're old enough," said Davey.

"I have kept an eye on him over the last two years and have tried to integrate him as quickly as I could into the first team.

The youngster is such a newcomer that his player profile on Barnsley FC's official website contains little detail and no photograph.

He can play as an outright striker or on the left, and is renowned for his speed.

"I was academy manager two years ago and I gave him a start in the under-18s," said Davey.

"He did well when he came on. He didn't give the ball away.

"He scored a hat-trick for the youth team against Sheffield United on Saturday.

"We need to look after him. He has got to be dipped in and perhaps dipped back out.

In the last 20 years, Millwall's Moses Ashikodi was the youngest player to make his Football League debut. He played in 2003, aged 15 years and 240 days.

Matthew Etherington, now with Premier League side West Ham, was 15 years and 262 days when he appeared for Peterborough in 1997.


GELDARD v. WATSON

Robert M. GELDARD, Sr., Appellant, v. Kay WATSON, Appellee.

No. 06-06-00045-CV.

Decided: January 25, 2007

Kay Watson petitioned the justice of the peace court for a forcible entry and detainer 1 to remove Robert M. Geldard, Sr., her stepfather, from the house in which he had lived for about thirty years. In defense, Geldard claimed equitable title and his homestead right to remain in possession of the property. Both the justice court and, on appeal, the county court at law found in Watson's favor.

Geldard again appeals, asserting two points of error: (1) that the trial court erred in finding Watson to have a superior right to possession against Geldard's homestead right and (2) that the trial court erred in refusing to take jurisdiction of his cross-action to quiet title. We find, sua sponte, that the courts below lacked jurisdiction to adjudicate Watson's cause of action. Accordingly, we vacate the judgment in Watson's favor and dismiss the appeal, including Geldard's counterclaim.

In January 1976, Geldard married Wanda Reed (Wanda) and moved into her house on Timberline in Longview, Gregg County, Texas, and the two resided together at that residence. The Timberline property appears to have been Wanda's separate property and estate. 2 Wanda and Geldard continued to reside together in the Timberline residence from their marriage in 1976 until Wanda entered a nursing home in October 2005, despite the fact that, in 1990, Wanda executed a quitclaim deed of the Timberline residence to Watson, her daughter from her earlier marriage. 3 Geldard did not sign the deed or any other instrument to cede any right he had in the home and Geldard continued to reside alone in the house after Wanda entered the nursing home. The parties dispute whether Geldard was aware that Wanda was going to execute the deed and when he actually discovered that she had done so.

On November 15, 2005, Watson posted a “Notice to Vacate” on the Timberline property and gave Geldard thirty days to quit his possession of the residence. Geldard refused to leave and, on December 19, 2005, Watson filed her petition for eviction in the justice court. Geldard asserted his spousal homestead right as a defense. Wanda died during the pendency of this action.

(2) The Limited Jurisdiction of the Justice Court

“The authority of a court to hear a particular case is a systemic requirement that cannot be waived or conferred by consent and which may be considered at any time.” Jacobs v. State, 181 S.W.3d 487, 488-89 (Tex.App.-Texarkana 2005, pet. ref'd). The issue of the subject-matter jurisdiction of the lower court(s) may be raised sua sponte by an appellate court. Id. (citing Tex. Ass'n of Bus. v. Tex. Air Control Bd., 852 S.W.2d 440, 445-46 (Tex.1993)).

Justice of the peace courts are courts of limited jurisdiction. See Tex. Const. art. V, § 19 Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 27.031 (Vernon 2004). Justice courts have original jurisdiction of a limited number of causes of action, including cases of forcible entry and detainer. See Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 27.031(a)(2). Justice courts expressly do not have jurisdiction of suits to try title to land. Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 27.031(b)(4).

A forcible detainer action is supposed to be a summary, speedy, and inexpensive proceeding to determine who has the right to immediate possession of a premises. See Fandey v. Lee, 880 S.W.2d 164, 168 (Tex.App.-El Paso 1994, writ denied). Where determination of the right to immediate possession requires adjudication or resolution of a title dispute, the justice court has no jurisdiction to enter judgment in the forcible (entry and) detainer action. See Tex.R. Civ. P. 746 (in forcible entry or forcible detainer actions in justice courts, “the only issue shall be as to the right to actual possession and the merits of the title shall not be adjudicated”) Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 27.031(b)(4) Rice v. Pinney, 51 S.W.3d 705, 708-09 (Tex.App.-Dallas 2001, no pet.). This Court has noted that, when the question of possession in a forcible entry and detainer action is “so integrally linked” to the question of title, the justice courts lack jurisdiction over the matter. See Tuncle v. Jackson, No. 06-05-00021-CV, 2005 WL 2715862, at *3, 2005 Tex.App. LEXIS 7557, at *5 (Tex.App.-Texarkana Sept. 14, 2005, no pet.) (mem. op.).

By statute, a county court at law in Gregg County has concurrent jurisdiction with the district court, except for capital murder cases. See Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 25.0942 (Vernon 2004). However, a county court at law exercising appellate jurisdiction over a justice court judgment is limited to the original jurisdiction of the justice court. See Tuncle, 2005 WL 2715862, at *2, 2005 Tex.App. LEXIS 7557, at *3 Rice, 51 S.W.3d at 708. Thus, a county court at law which might otherwise have jurisdiction to adjudicate title to real property is without jurisdiction to do so when sitting in its appellate jurisdiction over a forcible detainer suit from justice court. See Rice, 51 S.W.3d at 708-09.

Geldard's asserted homestead right in defense of the forcible detainer action raises an interesting question: does a homestead interest go to “the merits of title” so as to defeat jurisdiction over the forcible detainer cause of action in the justice court (and the county court or county court at law on appeal)?

(a) The Nature of Homestead Right

A spouse's homestead right in Texas predates statehood. See Tex. Const. art. XVI, § 50 interp. commentary (Vernon 1993). Spousal homestead rights have been constitutionally guaranteed since the first constitution of the State of Texas. See Tex. Const. of 1845, art. VII, § 22. The constitution currently provides that “[a]n owner or claimant of the property claimed as homestead may not sell or abandon the homestead without the consent of each owner and the spouse of each owner, given in such manner as may be prescribed by law.” Tex. Const. art. XVI, § 50(b) (emphasis added).

The Texas Family Code makes it clear that the requirement of the joining of both spouses to a conveyance of the homestead is mandatory, irrespective of the community or separate property nature of the realty constituting that homestead. See Tex. Fam.Code Ann. § 5.001 (Vernon 2006). “Whether the homestead is the separate property of either spouse or community property, neither spouse may sell, convey, or encumber the homestead without the joinder of the other spouse except as provided in this chapter or by other rules of law.” See Tex. Fam.Code Ann. § 5.001.

For over a century's consistent caselaw, the signature of one spouse to a lien on or a conveyance of the homestead, even if separate property, may not act to the detriment of a nonsigning spouse who would benefit from the homestead right. See Zable v. Henry, 649 S.W.2d 136 (Tex.App.-Dallas 1983, no writ) Morris v. Porter, 393 S.W.2d 385, 387 (Tex.Civ.App.-Houston 1965, writ ref'd n.r.e.) Gober v. Smith, 36 S.W. 910, 911 (Tex.Civ.App.1896). One spouse's conveyance of her separate property family homestead, without the joinder of the other spouse, is not void as to the conveying spouse. Grissom v. Anderson, 125 Tex. 26, 79 S.W.2d 619, 621 (1935). It is, however, inoperative against the continuing homestead claim of the nonjoining spouse. Id. “A conveyance by a husband, not joined by his wife, of the homestead property, is merely inoperative while the property continues to be a homestead, or until such time as the homestead may be abandoned, or the deed ratified in accordance with law.” Id.

(b) Geldard's Homestead Right

Watson asserts that Geldard did not prove facts evidencing homestead usage or intent at the relevant time, i.e., the 1990 conveyance. Geldard testified that:

Q. Since 1976, where have you lived?

A. [by Geldard] 406 Timberline Drive.

Q. You consider that to be your homestead?

Watson asserts that this testimony, stating the homestead intent in the present tense, does not adequately prove the homestead nature of the property as of the date of the 1990 conveyance.

We disagree that Geldard's specific testimony that he considered the property to be his homestead in 1990 is required. The evidence of Geldard's actual use of the property as a homestead in 1976 was satisfactory and convincing to raise the issue. See Braden Steel Corp. v. McClure, 603 S.W.2d 288, 292-93 (Tex.Civ.App.-Amarillo 1980, no writ) Youngblood v. Youngblood, 124 Tex. 184, 76 S.W.2d 759, 760-61 (Tex. Comm'n App.1934). Geldard testified to residing in the Timberline house as (apparently) his only residence since 1976, as the spouse of the owner. Watson herself testified that, as of 1976, Wanda resided with Geldard in the Timberline house as her homestead. In the absence of evidence of Geldard's dual residence, homestead disclaimer, abandonment of the homestead, or other similar evidence which demonstrated that his homestead right had terminated, further inquiry into Geldard's intent to use the property as a homestead, beyond the fact of his actual occupancy and use of the property as a home, is unwarranted. See McClure, 603 S.W.2d at 292-93.

Watson further contends that Geldard either joined or ratified the conveyance from Wanda to Watson, so as to eliminate his homestead right. Although Watson testified that she and her mother discussed their intended action with Geldard before the conveyance, Geldard's alleged failure to protest when informed of the intended conveyance does not serve as a valid joinder under the statute. See Smith v. Prater, 161 S.W.2d 361, 362 (Tex.Civ.App.-San Antonio 1942, no writ). Watson, citing corporate agency caselaw, asserts that Geldard ratified Wanda's conveyance to Watson because of his silence and because he “never gave the impression that he didn't want Appellee to own the house.” Watson's cited authority is not on point, and we are unpersuaded that principles of corporate agency have any application to the alleged real property conveyance before us. Ratification of the conveyance of the homestead by the nonjoining spouse requires a formal recognition of the conveyance through execution of an instrument. See Kunkel v. Kunkel, 515 S.W.2d 941, 948 (Tex.Civ.App.-Amarillo 1974, writ ref'd n.r.e.). Silence in this circumstance is not ratification and the facts of this case as presented do not prove ratification.

(4) Homestead Right Defeating Jurisdiction

Justice courts' limited jurisdiction forecloses its adjudication of “the merits of the title” to real property. Tex.R. Civ. P. 746 see also Tex. Gov't Code Ann. § 27.031(b)(4). The merits of title were called into question in this suit due to Geldard's claim of his nonjoining spouse homestead right. The question, then, is whether the homestead “right” implicates the “merits of the title.”

The homestead right constitutes an estate in land. Laster v. First Huntsville Prop. Co., 826 S.W.2d 125, 129 (Tex.1991). “This estate is analogous to a life tenancy, with the holder of the homestead right possessing the rights similar to those of a life tenant for so long as the property retains its homestead character.” Id. The homestead estate is a vested interest. See Morris, 393 S.W.2d at 387. The homestead estate has the effect of reducing the underlying ownership rights to “something akin to remainder interests.” Laster, 826 S.W.2d at 129 (quoting United States v. Rodgers, 461 U.S. 677, 686, 103 S.Ct. 2132, 76 L.Ed.2d 236 (1983)).

As we have noted, so long as a spouse continues to assert his homestead right, a conveyance without his joinder is wholly inoperative as against that nonjoining spouse. See Zable, 649 S.W.2d at 137-38 (citing Lewis v. Brown, 321 S.W.2d 313, 317 (Tex.Civ.App.-Fort Worth 1959, writ ref'd n.r.e.)). The continuing right to the homestead estate does not exist in a legal vacuum. The homestead right is asserted under the title from which it arose: the signing spouse's title to her separate property. See Marino v. Lombardo, 277 S.W.2d 749, 754 (Tex.Civ.App.-Beaumont 1955, writ ref'd n.r.e.). Indeed, one court has recognized that the signing spouse retains legal title while the nonjoining spouse exercises the homestead right. See id. On the termination of the homesteading spouse's homestead right, the legal title passes to the grantee and becomes operative. See id. We find that a nonjoining spouse exercising the homestead right to his spouse's conveyance of a separate property homestead exerts a right to possession under the granting spouse's title.

The determination of Watson's right to possession in her forcible detainer action necessarily required an adjudication of the merits of title between Watson (by conveyance from Wanda) and Geldard (as the claimant of a homestead right under Wanda's separate title). Thus, the justice court adjudicated the merits of title in determining Watson's right to possession in her forcible detainer action. The justice court's judgment, and the county court at law judgment on appeal, are void. See Gentry v. Marburger, 596 S.W.2d 201 (Tex.Civ.App.-Houston [1st Dist.] 1980, writ ref'd n.r.e.).

As a final matter, we note that Geldard's request to order the court below to sever rather than dismiss his counterpetition is moot pursuant to our conclusion that the courts below lacked jurisdiction. See Perry v. Del Rio, 66 S.W.3d 239, 256 (Tex.2001).

We vacate the judgment below, and dismiss the appeal.

1. Both parties go back and forth in their pleadings, as do both courts below on their dockets and in their judgments, as to whether this was a forcible detainer cause of action or a forcible entry and detainer cause of action.We note that the term “ ‘forcible entry and detainer’ is often used to describe both an action for forcible entry and detainer, as well as an action for forcible detainer.” 41 Tex. Jur.3dForcible Entry and Detainer § 1 (2006). Although the causes of action are distinct, compare Tex. Prop.Code Ann. § 24.001 (Vernon 2000) with Tex. Prop.Code Ann. § 24.002(a) (Vernon 2000), for our purposes in this opinion, the analysis is the same.We note, parenthetically, that Watson appears to have failed to assert or prove essential elements of both causes of action: (1) the landlord/tenant relationship necessary for a forcible detainer action and (2) both Geldard's forcible entry and Watson's own possession necessary for a forcible entry and detainer action. See Dent v. Pines, 394 S.W.2d 266, 268 (Tex.Civ.App.-Houston 1965, no writ) Am. Spiritualist Ass'n v. Ravkind, 313 S.W.2d 121, 124-25 (Tex.Civ.App.-Dallas 1958, writ ref'd n.r.e.).

2. The record contains no facts in support of this, but both parties seem to concede this point. The record indicates that Wanda bought the property in 1967 with Ocie Reed, an earlier husband (who was also Watson's father). Though the record contains no evidence as to Ocie Reed's whereabouts after the purchase or the disposition of any interest which he may have owned in the property, Watson's counsel asserts on appeal that Ocie Reed died in 1971.

3. Though Watson testified to the fact of this conveyance, no deed offered or admitted as evidence indicated Wanda's ownership of the property, let alone Watson's. Watson submitted only a deed from Wanda and Ocie Reed to a William Stone and a “Quit Claim Deed” from (blank) to (blank) of an undetermined “foregoing instrument.”


Geldard Albert Image 5 Everton 1934

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Description

Bradford, Yorkshire born outside right Albert Geldard played his youth football with Bradford Schools and Manningham Mills in 1929 before he joined Second Division Bradford Park Avenue as a professional on 1st September 1929. His Football League debut came against Millwall at The Den on 16th September, so becoming the youngest player to appear in the Football League at just 15 years and 158 days old. He left Bradford Park Avenue having scored six goals in 34 matches over three years at the club, signing for First Division club Everton on 14th November 1932 for a then record fee of £4,000. His Toffees debut came at Middlesbrough where he scored in a 2-0 win and also on his home debut in a 2-2 draw with Bolton Wanderers a week later. In his first season he went to Wembley with Everton and emerged with an FA Cup winner’s medal as they beat Manchester City 3-0 in the 1933 FA Cup Final, with Geldard’s cross making the third goal. In October he played in the 1933 FA Charity Shield as Everton were beaten 3-0 by League Champions Arsenal at Goodison Park.

Geldard was first called up for England in May 1933 aged 19 when he played in a 1-1 draw against Italy in Rome, winning his second cap a week later against Switzerland in Berne. He won 2 further England caps in a defeat to Scotland at Hampden Park in April 1935 and in a 5-1 win over Ireland in Belfast in October 1937. He also represented The Football League on one occasion, playing as they beat The Irish League 3-0 at Bloomfield Road, Blackpool in October 1937.

Historian Tony Matthews described him thus: “Geldard was a slippery customer who possessed an exceptional turn of speed, could shoot with both feet and enjoyed taking on opponents, either on the outside or inside.” Taking part in the “cup tie of the century” on 30th January 1935, Geldard scored two goals to help Everton progress into the fifth round of the 1935 FA Cup after their 6-4 defeat of Sunderland.

After 37 goals in 180 matches for Everton over six seasons at Goodison Park, Bolton Wanderers signed Geldard for £7,000 in July 1938, and his debut came against Charlton Athletic on 27th August 1938, and he scored his first goal for The Trotters on 18th February 1939 against his former club Everton. Tommy Lawton was disappointed at the trade of Geldard saying “He was the fastest thing on two legs over ten yards. We had other wingers like Torry Gillick, Wally Boyes and Jimmy Caskie, but Albert had played for England only the season before, when he’d kept Stan Matthews out of the team. I thought we’d miss him.”

But only just after a year after his Bolton transfer his career was interrupted by the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939. He was enlisted in the 53rd Field Regiment Royal Artillery (Bolton Artillery) in May 1939 to fight along with 14 of his Bolton team mates, after a single goal in only 24 matches for The Trotters and during the War he represented The Army at football. He returned from the War to play for Bolton in their 1946 FA Cup campaign when they reached the FA Cup semi-final, which he played in as they lost to Charlton Athletic at Villa Park, and in total he played 18 more matches for The Trotters, scoring once more, but was forced to retire from professional football after a knee injury in May 1947. He later played for Lancashire Combination club Darwen joining them in December 1949 before his eventual retirement.


Contents

Bradford Park Avenue [ edit ]

Geldard was born at Bradford, Yorkshire and played his youth football with Bradford Schools and Manningham Mills. Ώ] Magic was one of Geldard's hobbies, with toffeeweb referring to the winger as "a real wizard, both on and off the pitch. His hobbies included magic tricks and he was one of the trickiest right wingers ever seen: he was devastatingly fast and he had a trick-bag that seemingly never ran out." ΐ] He joined Bradford Park Avenue as a professional in 1928.

His debut came at The Den on 16 September 1929 against Millwall to become the youngest player to appear in the Football League at just 15 years and 158 days old. Α] He left Bradford Park Avenue having scored six goals in 34 games signing for Everton on 14 November 1932 for a then record fee of £4,000. Α]

Everton [ edit ]

Joining Everton, his debut came against Middlesbrough where he scored a goal. Β] Geldard formed a duet with striker Tommy Lawton, by producing good crosses for him to head home. Γ] Tony Matthews described Geldard as "Geldard was a slippery customer who possessed an exceptional turn of speed, could shoot with both feet and enjoyed taking on opponents, either on the outside or inside." Δ] Taking part in the cup-tie of the century on 30 January 1935, Geldard scored two goals to help Everton progress into the fifth round of the 1935 FA Cup after the 6–4 defeat of Sunderland. ΐ]

Geldard was part of the Everton side that won the 1933 FA Cup Final with a 3–0 win over Manchester City at Wembley with goals from Jimmy Stein, Dixie Dean and James Dunn with Geldard crossing in for the third goal. Ε] Tommy Lawton was disappointed at the trade of Geldard saying "He was the fastest thing on two legs over ten yards. We had other wingers like Torry Gillick, Wally Boyes and Jimmy Caskie, but Albert had played for England only the season before, when he'd kept Stan Matthews out of the team. I thought we'd miss him." Γ] In total Geldard had made 140 appearances for Everton scoring 38 goals. Γ]

Bolton Wanderers [ edit ]

Bolton Wanderers signed Geldard for £4,500 in July 1938, and his debut came against Charlton Athletic on 27 August 1938 and scored his first goal for The Trotters on 18 February 1939 against his former club Everton. Ζ] He was enlisted in the 53rd field regiment RA (Bolton Artillery) in May 1939 to fight in the Second World War along with 14 of his Bolton teammates. Η]

Darwen [ edit ]

He returned from the war with an agreement with Bolton for him to play on semi professional terms for Darwen and played a few games for the Lancashire-based club, ⎖] after World War II, Geldard returned to play for Bolton in 1946 and played nine games scoring a single goal, Ζ] but was forced to retire from football after a knee injury in 1947. ⎖]


Richard Geldard '57 Talks Contrasting Decades of Influence

In the dimly remembered fall of 1953, we members of the all-male Class of 1957 arrived in Brunswick, found our rooms and mates, were chosen by a fraternity, suffered hazing, and settled in. What we did not know at the time was that these four years would mimic a singular normality in American culture and character. The next decade, the Sixties, would become forever famous as the beginning of another era that would change America forever. Those two decades would define my formal education, from Bowdoin to The Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury, and then out to Stanford for a doctorate. As I look back now, the time of my formal education was a sequence of influences and impressions but not a time of personal control and self-knowledge. Fortunately for me, however, was that the influences were from gifted and important sources. In my Bowdoin years, members of the faculty like Athern Daggett 󈧝 and Frederic “Tilly” Tillotson H󈧲 were important. Especially Tilley, because the central focus was my four-year tenure as a member of the Meddiebempsters, the nine-person ensemble that went from barbershop four-part harmony to modern jazz with seven parts created by the absolute perfect pitch of director and arranger Terry Stenberg 󈧼.

In those years, highlights were the trip to Europe with the USO to serenade American troops in Germany and a moving experience at Carnegie Hall. I recall that evening in New York looking down at the worn floorboards and thinking of the great artists who had performed there. Such are little moments that stick over the years.

After Bowdoin came the army, in my case the armor school at Ft. Knox. Excellent training but not many memorable moments. Coming next of note was a return to The Taft School, my alma mater, to teach English and theater. I needed more depth in both subjects, a problem solved by Bread Loaf, a powerful experience because of the faculty assembled every summer in Vermont. It was there that I found Greek tragedy with the great translator William Arrowsmith, and Emerson with the prodigious Harold Bloom. In Emerson class with Bloom, one of his many stories involved a cocktail hour conversation he had with then Yale president Bart Giamatti, who asked Bloom how his Emerson class was going.

“Fine,” Bloom replied, “but I wish people would stop thinking of Emerson as sweet.”

“Sweet?!” Giamatti exclaimed. “He’s about as sweet as barbed wire.”

It was that, and my own subsequent study, that agreed with Giamatti’s corrective assessment. 

These resources and hard work opened doors at Stanford. For example, a letter from Arrowsmith convinced TBL Webster, the world’s expert on fifth century BCE Athens, to agree to be first reader for my dissertation on the plays of Socrates. Thus, I became a theatre and classics major.

My three years at Stanford brought several major themes together: Academic discipline and idealism, the latter a term in philosophy centering on the primacy of thought and ideas, leading also to the study of universal consciousness. The late Sixties saw the influx of mostly Indian and Tibetan scholars and teachers, first to California, and then in the Seventies eastward to the aftermath of Woodstock in 1969. The task of serious scholarship in this atmosphere was to filter out the fairy dust in order to reveal principle and perhaps even reality.

My published work on early Greek thought and Emerson’s transcendentalism has been my effort to separate wheat from chaff. Many others now labor to do the same in the ongoing study of consciousness, including now in the advanced study of quantum mechanics.

During the period following Stanford I moved to New York to assume the role of upper school head of Collegiate, the oldest school in America, founded by the Dutch in 1633. One of the many bright students I taught is now my stepson, whose mother, the artist and writer Astrid Fitzgerald, is now my wife going on forty years. And it was through her friends that I was invited by Knopf to write a book to be entitled The Traveler's Key to the Sacred Places of Ancient Greece. The word “sacred” in the title was, and still is, my effort to bring the ideas of idealism front and center in a serious challenge to materialism. The work of preparing this book took several years and trips to Greece. Astrid was photographer, designer, and reader. Long hours finally completed, the book was published in 1989 and its success and positive comments set me to work on other writing projects, books on Emerson’s idealism and a series on pre-Socratic philosophy.

I consider the two seemingly divergent areas of my study and writing to be one broad exploration of non-religious transcendence centering on the nature of consciousness. Although other traditions also share this interest, I have centered my work on Greek and American transcendentalism as articulated by Emerson and Thoreau. In addition to books, I have taught online courses in degree programs and also lectured widely, a career slowed now by age and infirmity. I continue to write, however. Last year Larson Books published a novella entitled The Magdalene Gates. The history and accounts of Mary of Magdala appeared in dramatic fashion in material discovered in Egypt in 1945. Published later with the title The Nag Hammadi Scriptures, the materials included what appears to be a letter entitled “The Gospel of Mary Magdalene,” that was carefully edited to eliminate material that might challenge Roman Church doctrines. Just last year, however, Pope Francis declared that Mary of Magdala should now be called “Disciple to the Disciples,” thus lifting her in the eyes of Christians from the negative accounts of her image in the gospels. My fictional story filled some gaps in her gospel and also told a love story, which does not involve Mary!

I suppose that I will be a writer as long as these fingers can press the keys.

I don't imagine that I would be effective at dictation. Currently, I am editing a manuscript with a writing partner, Benjamin Cunningham, a renowned mediation lawyer in Austin, Texas. Ben is an expert on hermetic studies, which will fill an important gap in my own background. 

Now, as we hibernate in fear of COVID-19, we can wonder what sort of country will emerge from this crisis, what values will support our recovery, and what knowledge of ourselves as a nation we will find. I will put my trust in the young women and men of Bowdoin, and my granddaughter and friends at Mount Holyoke, to find solutions to pandemics and global warming so that they can look back as fondly as I have done at a personal life, starting as mine did among the pines of Bowdoin. A note of caution: As my late roommate Payson Perkins 󈧽 used to say, looking up as we walked with our dates to the stadium through those tall pines, “Look out for the pine cones.”  

This story first appeared in the Spring/Summer 2020 issue of   Bowdoin Magazine.  Manage your subscription and see other stories from the magazine on the  Bowdoin Magazine website .


Watch the video: Let it be LennonMcCartneyGeldard (July 2022).


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